Wednesday, May 23, 2012

Mapping Beyond the Flanaess: The Ocean of Storms

And here we are, the last map of western Oerik. The new map is in the lower-right corner below; I'm including the surrounding maps so you can see how they all fit together.



As usual, the link to the largest size file is off to the right.

One thing I particularly want to mention is the source of the Great River Ithru; I envision it as an enormous spring gushing out of the mountains, with its origins either in the Elemental Plane of Water or the Underoerth, according to contradictory local myth.

I also envision great religiously-fueled tension between Erypt and those lands to its south. The Eryptians revere the river and have a taboo against living on the west bank, which they associate with death. The very existence of cities along the west bank of the river is an affront to their religious sensibilities, and wars have been fought trying to raise them to the ground in the name of faith. (The Eryptian city of Dahina does not count, as it is in the great delta of the river, and not along the river proper.)

The free city of Urush-Pth I see as a haven for outcasts from Erypt, full of plotting and intrigue against the dynasties of the priest-kings, fueled by the agents of Kesh, Memr, and Buha. Its position also makes it the first civilized port of call for eastward-bound trading vessels from Ishtarland, the Tharqish Empire, and Lynn, so it could be a fascinating place indeed.

While at some point I will probably tackle Fireland and Hepmonaland, my principle aim is now achieved; pulling together the disparate sources that described western Oerik and hopefully making some sense out of sometimes contradictory material. One thing I will be doing in the next day or two is to adjust some of the colors on the oceans; I don't have the color progression quite right from shallow to deepest. Once I've made those adjustments and re-run the maps, I'll bundle them all together into a single compressed file for download, and maybe, just maybe, I'll have another surprise at the same time. We'll have to see.

Until then, enjoy, and thanks for everyone's support while I've been doing this. It's been a lot of fun!

1 comment:

mortellan said...

Helluva job Joseph! You've made even the most remote and undetailed areas at least interesting. I look forward to your follow up work and any tweaks.